Schedules for the four finalists for director, Chicano Hispano Mexicano Studies have been set. Each candidate will be on campus for two days, with visits scheduled between Monday, Feb. 28 and Thursday, March 10.

They are:
Ernesto Chávez, associate professor of history, University of Texas at El Paso; is scheduled to be on campus Monday-Tuesday, Feb. 28-March 1. Events open to the public with Chávez are:

Feb 28 Monday

Noon Student Lunch in Chicano Studies Conference Room
3:30 p.m. Research Talk in Communication & Journalism, Room 116

Mar 1 Tuesday

9 a.m. CHMS Program Talk in Scholes Hall, Roberts Room 204

Alicia Gaspar de Alba, professor of Chicana/o studies, English and women's studies, is on campus Wednesday-Thursday, March 2-3.

Events open to the public with Gaspar de Alba are:

Mar 2 Wednesday

10 a.m. Research Talk in Communication & Journalism, Room 116
Noon Student Lunch in Chicano Studies Conference Room

Mar 3 Thursday

9 a.m. CHMS Program Talk in Scholes Hall, Room 101

Luis Urrieta Jr., associate professor, program coordinator and graduate advisor of cultural studies, University of Texas at Austin, is on campus Monday-Tuesday, March 7-8.

Events open to the public with Urrieta are:

Mar 7 Monday

10 a.m. Research Talk in Communication & Journalism, Room 116
Noon Student Lunch in Chicano Studies Conference Room

Mar 8 Tuesday

9 a.m. CHMS Program Talk in Scholes Hall, Room 101


Irene Morris Vásquez, chair, academic senate, California State University Dominguez Hills, is on campus Wednesday-Thursday, March 9-10.

Events open to the public with Vásquez are:

Mar 9 Wednesday

10 a.m. Research Talk in Communication & Journalism, Room 116
Noon Student Lunch in Chicano Studies Conference Room

Mar 10 Thursday

9 a.m. CHMS Program Talk in Scholes Hall, Roberts Room 204

Chávez earned his academic degrees in United States history at the University of California at Los Angeles. His 1994 dissertation is titled, "Creating Aztlán: The Chicano Movement in Los Angeles, 1966-1978." He published a book based on his dissertation in 2002 and subsequently published "The U.S. War with Mexico War: A Brief History with Documents," in 2007. He is currently working on a book, "Crossing the Boundaries of Race, Religion, and Desire: The Life of Ramón Novarro." Chávez has been on faculty at UTEP since 2004.

Gaspar de Alba earned her Ph.D. in American Studies at UNM in 1994. Her dissertation is titled, "Mi Casa Es Su Casa": The Cultural Politics of the Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation, 1965-1985 Exhibition. Her areas of specialization are Chicano/a art, popular culture, literature, border studies, gender and sexuality studies and creative writing.

At UCLA, Gaspar de Alba served as chair of the Department of Chicana/o Studies and as associate director of the Chicano Studies Research Center. She served as co-editor of the CSRC publication, Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies. Additionally, she served as interim director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Studies Program.

Gaspar de Alba is the recipient of multiple awards for her books, "Desert Blood: The Juárez Murders," its Spanish language version, "Sangre en el desierto: las muertas de Juárez," and "Sor Juana's Second Dream" She received a Rockefeller Fellowship for Latino/a Cultural Study at the Smithsonian as well as a UCMexus Research Grant, among others.

Urrieta earned his Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2003. His dissertation is titled, "Orchestrating the Selves: Chicana and Chicano negotiations of identity, ideology, and activism in Education." In 2009, he published, "Working from Within: Chicana and Chicano Activist Educators in Whitestream Schools." He has published extensively in English and Spanish and is also proficient in Portuguese. He received a National Science Foundation Writing Fellowship in 2010 and was named one of 12 top scholars under 40 by "Diverse Issues in Higher Education."

Since 2009, Urrieta has served as associate professor of cultural studies in education in UT Austin's Mexican American Studies & Indigenous Studies. During that time, he was a Fulbright Scholar to Mexico at the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo in Morelia, Michoacán.

Irene Morris Vásquez received her Ph.D. from the History Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. Currently, she is Chair and Associate Professor of the Chicana/o Studies Department at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Irene also serves as the Coordinator of World Cultural Studies, which houses Africana Studies, Asian Pacific Studies, Chicana/o Studies and Women's Studies.

Irene Morris Vásquez' research and teaching interests include Indigenous peoples of the Americas, Afro-Mexican/Latino relations, U.S. Social Movements, Women of Color Feminism, and Intercultural Collaboration and Peace Building. Presently, she is co-authoring a book on the Chicana/o Movement entitled, Aztlan Making: The Chicana/o Movement: Ideology and Culture, 1966-1977. She has written several essays in English and Spanish on the historic and contemporary relations between African Americans and Latin American descent peoples. In 2006, Irene Vásquez co-edited the Borders Within Us: Three Global Diasporas, published by New World African Press.

Media contact: Carolyn Gonzales, 277-5920; e-mail: cgonzal@unm.edu