The University of New Mexico Art Museum will be closed Thursday, July 4 through Saturday, July 6 for the holiday weekend. Regular hours resume on Tuesday, July 9.

The museum notes that the week of July 9 through 13 is the last chance to see:
Enrique Chagoya, Les Aventures des Cannibales Moderniste, 1999, Eight panel accordion fold codex Lithograph, woodcut, chine collé, edition 18 of 30, Purchased with funds from the Friends of Art
Enrique Chagoya, Les Aventures des Cannibales Moderniste, 1999, Eight panel accordion fold codex, Lithograph, woodcut, chine collé, edition 18 of 30, Purchased with funds from the Friends of Art


Bound Together: Seeking Pleasure in Books - an exhibition that celebrates the book, from 19th century photographic albums to limited edition and unique artist books, illustrated literary works, unusual pop-up books, medieval manuscript facsimiles and architectural folios, to name just some of the objects in the exhibition. Though the digital age is very much upon us, carrying with it many publishing casualties, books continue to be produced and cherished as they have for millennia.

The dichotomy that books present is that they are simultaneously private objects meant to be held in one’s hands, often read in private, yet are also objects mass produced, available to large audiences, viewed and or read in very public arenas. Some of the works include Henri Matisse’s Le Florilege des Amours, Some Memories of Drawing by Georgia O’Keeffe, a first edition of An Autobiography by Frank Lloyd Wright and The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, illustrated by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and printed at Kelmscott press by William Morris. Contemporary artists in the exhibition who have used the book as a vehicle of expression include Kara Walker, Ed Ruscha, Barbara de Genevieve, Julie Chen and Enrique Chagoya.

Martin Stupich , Bridge over canal, Venice, California, 1974, Pigment inkjet print, Courtesy of the Artist
Martin Stupich , Bridge over canal, Venice, California, 1974, Pigment inkjet print, Courtesy of the Artist
Martin Stupich: Remnants of the First World - We build and shape our landscapes and terrains—gardens, bridges, truck stops, quarries, canals and dams—to suit both our physical and emotional desires. Yet this is not without consequences. This exhibition presents a selection of potent images from a larger body of work that Martin Stupich has explored and recorded since the 1970s.

These images of some of our most ambitious, often permanent structures are breathtaking to behold yet also pose questions about what it is we are leaving behind as the “remnants” of our culture and time. Stupich clearly works within a historical sphere which harks back to the nineteenth-century and includes some of the great camera artists of that era such as Timothy O’Sullivan, Carleton Watkins and Darius Kinsey.

Media Contact: Carolyn Gonzales (505) 277-5920; email: cgonzal@unm.edu