Lobo Food Pantry
Every month during the spring and fall semesters, Roadrunner Food Bank of New Mexico brings in 5,000 pounds of food to be given away to students, staff, faculty and community members.

Annually, the University Communication and Marketing (UCAM) Department compiles a list of its Top-10 general News stories during the course of the year. Below is the list of UNM's Top-10 general News stories for 2015. The stories are in random order.

UNM helping feed the community
It’s estimated that more than 360,000 people in New Mexico are at risk to go hungry. It’s a staggering statistic the state’s largest university is working hard to change with the monthly Lobo Food Pantry.

From Russia with love
Larisa Dmitrieva is still growing into life as Julia Lambright, an emancipation of sorts from a difficult past. She grew up in a Moscow orphanage during Soviet Russia, where she saw the stark contrast between life inside and outside the orphanage walls.

Sonya Romero, the reluctant hero
Not many people can say they’ve been up close and personal with Ellen DeGeneres. But University of New Mexico alumna Sonya Romero can. DeGeneres invited the kindergarten teacher, known for her “big heart,” to the show after hearing about her work with and for underprivileged students, a group that teachers claim is on the rise.

Hannah Groves, a student in the class with members of a family she works with as an advocate.

Unique course turns students into advocates for Albuquerque refugee families
Jessica Goodkind, associate professor of Sociology at the University of New Mexico, specializes in change. Her nine credit hour, two semester course begins each fall teaching undergraduate students what refugees are, and what kind of world conditions caused them to leave their homes and seek a new life in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

PPD produces power for the UNM campus “cheaper than we can buy it”
The Physical Plant Department (PPD) has been producing energy for the University campus for over 30 years. PPD now has two highly efficient cogeneration units that provide a significant amount of the energy needed on campus day in and day out.

UNM's Meteorite Museum reopens with futuristic design
At the University of New Mexico, it houses a collection like none other with specimens dating back 4.5 billion years. Gone are the old burlap-covered walls and outdated lighting, which have been replaced with sleek gray paint and energy-saving LED lights and new display cases featuring a futuristic design that makes any display inviting. 

Sandia National Labs, UNM receives R&D 100 award
Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico received the 2015 Gold Award in Green Technology for the development of the CO2 memzyme. It was selected as one of the 100 most technologically significant new projects of the year in the Mechanical/Materials category by R&D magazine. The CO2 memzyme is an extremely thin membrane that separates and captures carbon. This meets one of the U.S. Department of Energy’s targets to help reduce the threat of climate change.

Cindy Nava, second from left, with (l. to r.) U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, U.S. Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham and Second Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

Ms. Nava goes to Washington
Keep moving forward, regardless of the odds are words that University of New Mexico student, Cindy Nava lives by. She came to this country at the age of six with her brother and sister because the conditions in Mexico were difficult and her parents wanted a better life for them. When Cindy came to UNM, she faced the financial burden of having to pay for classes on her own, because she wasn’t eligible for federal funding. She couldn’t apply for a job, because she didn’t have a Social Security number.

Research project on climate change takes an abrupt turn
It began with a National Science Foundation travel grant to Nepal. Three faculty members from the University of New Mexico and three graduate students spent the winter break between semesters traveling in Nepal, meeting people and talking with potential collaborators.

Work relationships matter…and they can save lives
Most of our waking hours during the week are spent at work and with the people we work with. We get to know one another’s personalities, likes and dislikes, habits, sense of humor, and so on. Positive work relationships have been proven to be important to our overall sense of well-being and job satisfaction, but beyond this, our relationships at work can help us when we need it most.