The University of New Mexico, along with 10 other organizations, gathered recently to support the Global Embassy of Activist Peace (GEAP) and Indigenous Peoples from around the U.S. to discuss environmental protection.

The Fourth International Encounter of the Children of Mother earth gathered together to express the need for care and restoration of the planet and its natural resources. The international event took place at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque.

Eliseo “Cheo” Torres, vice president for Student Affairs, represented UNM.  

“I was pleased to serve as one of the University representatives today in the Fourth International Encounter of the Children of Mother Earth summit hosted by the Global Embassy of Activists for Peace held at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center,” he said. “The summit honored the founder of GEAP, Ambassador Dr. William Soto Santiago, who was also honored at a ceremony on the UNM campus Wednesday.”

There, the leaders of Indigenous Peoples from across the U.S. drafted an official document containing proposals to help repair and care for the environment. The document will be spread nationally and internationally to educational centers, communities, and media outlets in more that 22 countries where GEAP exists.

The event also held several discussions on subjects such as conservation and restoration of water sources, biodiversity, the adaption and effect to climate change, the prevention of ethnocide, among others.

“I was very impressed with the diversity of participants from Latin America, out of state and through New Mexico, who are discussing policies that will impact our environment and national resources,” Torres said. “The University is partnering with GEAP to help solve our environmental problems, especially with respect to indigenous needs world-wide.”

For more information on GEAP, visit their website or contact the national coordinator for GEAP, Juan Enrique García, at peaceactivistept@gmail.com or at (915) 235-5285.

To find out more information and how to get involved, visit Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.