Jay Parkes, Ph.D., is in his 20th year on the UNM faculty and is Professor of Educational Psychology. He is completing an eight-year term as Chair of the Department of Individual, Family, and Community Education in the College of Education. His scholarly work has been in the areas of classroom assessment and student learning.  He teaches courses in classroom assessment, educational research design, introductory applied statistics and educational measurement. He and his family reside in Santa Fe.

Dr. Parkes believes that the faculty are a core element, perhaps the core element, in a vibrant, healthy university. As UNM re-engineers, the current strengths and concerns of the faculty need to be addressed in innovative and sustainable ways. In the re-engineering there is great opportunity to look at policies and practices which address a variety of work life issues. Clear policies, consistently applied, are themselves a contribution to workplace satisfaction. Within the portfolio of the Senior Vice Provost there is great opportunity to impact the work life quality of those in Academic Affairs.

Dr. Parkes has a long history of collaborative faculty governance. For example, he coordinated the College of Education’s Core Mission Process in 2009-2010, facilitating a year-long process resulting in the unanimous faculty approval of the COE’s Core Values. During his time as department chair, the department developed the IFCE Research Showcase, which brought ~150 visitors annually to interact with ~40 department researchers, raising research visibility and promoting collaboration from 2011 to 2018. As another example, while chairing the College of Education’s Scholarship committee, staff, faculty, and the community were engaged, and the committee increased the number of applicants 25%; raised the mean per awardee amount 129%; increased the minimum award from $100 to $750; and raised the total amount awarded from $284,124.54 to $324,747.75 per year.

Dr. Parkes’ scholarly work has been in the areas of classroom assessment and student learning.  For example, he has collaborated with the School of Medicine’s Assessment and Learning Office over the years, including being Co-PI on a grant from the Stemmler Fund of the National Board of Medical Examiners to study medical students’ peer feedback. He has also co-authored two books (Learning and Assessing with Multiple-Choice Questions in College Classrooms and The College Classroom Assessment Compendium: A Practical Guide to the College Instructor’s Daily Assessment Life) on the theme of using classroom assessment to maximize student learning in higher education. His community related scholarship includes work with dual language education researchers and educators in New Mexico, nationally, and internationally.

In addition to teaching courses in classroom assessment, educational research design, introductory applied statistics and educational measurement, Dr. Parkes has served on more than 40 dissertation committees across campus.

Dr. Parkes lives in Santa Fe with his wife and children, where he’s involved at his church and with the Boy Scouts of America.